The Faraday Institution announces £42 million for energy storage research

23 January 2018

The Faraday Institution, based at the Harwell Science and Innovation Campus in Oxfordshire, has today announced up to £42 million in new government funding to four UK-based consortia to conduct application-inspired research aimed at overcoming battery challenges to accelerate the electric vehicle (EV) revolution.

A team from STFC will be involved in one of the projects on recycling lithium batteries.

If successful these four new research projects will put the UK on the map as being at the forefront of battery technology worldwide. It has the potential to radically increase the speed with which we are able to make the move to electric vehicles, as well as the speed with which we can decarbonize our energy supply, with obvious benefits to the environment.

Business Minister Richard Harrington said, “Government investment, through the Faraday Institution, in the projects announced today will deliver valuable research that will help us seize the economic opportunities presented by battery technology and our transition to a low-carbon economy.”

The topics for the four projects were chosen in consultation with industry, who will partner closely with each of them. This unique collaboration will help to ensure that the research is producing findings and solutions that meet the needs of business. In addition, industrial partners will contribute a total of £4.6 million in in-kind support to the following four projects:

  • Extending battery life - Led by the University of Cambridge with nine other university and 10 industry partners, this project will examine how environmental and internal battery stresses (such as high temperatures, charging and discharging rates) damage electric vehicle (EV) batteries over time.
  • Battery system modelling - Imperial College London (ICL) will lead a consortium of six other university and 17 industry partners to equip industry and academia with new software tools to understand and predict battery performance, by connecting understanding of battery materials at the atomic level all the way up to an assembled battery pack.
  • Recycling and reuse - A project led by the University of Birmingham, and involving STFC and six other academic institutions and 14 industrial partners, will determine the ways in which spent lithium batteries can be recycled.
  • Next generation solid state batteries - The University of Oxford will lead an effort with six other university partners and nine industrial partners to break down the barriers that are preventing the progression to market of solid-state batteries, that should be lighter and safer, meaning cost savings and less reliance on cooling systems.

You can read more about this initiative on the EPSRC website.


Notes to Editors:

The Faraday Institution is the UK's independent, national institute for electrochemical energy storage science and technology, supporting research, training, and analysis. Bringing together expertise from universities and industry, The Faraday Institution endeavours to make the UK the go-to place for the research of the development, manufacture and production of new electrical storage technologies for both the automotive and the wider relevant sectors.

The 'Faraday Battery Challenge' is to develop and manufacture batteries for the electrification of vehicles - £246 million over four years - to help UK businesses seize the opportunities presented by the move to a low-carbon economy. The challenge will be split into three elements: research, innovation, and scale-up. It is among the first of six investment areas announced by the government to be funded through the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund.

Science and Technology Facilities Council Switchboard: 01793 442000