How teens can help test space satellites

3 August 2017

Katherine Mordecai

Katherine Mordecai, Mechanical Engineering Apprentice.
(Credit: STFC)

Aspiring engineers as young as 14 are being invited to one of the country’s leading science facilities to find out how they could soon help to build particle accelerators and test satellites destined for space.

The Science and Technology Facilities Council and Diamond Light Source are hosting an Apprentice Day on August 23 at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxfordshire for potential apprentices aged 14 and over. Please note that advanced registration for the event is essential.

The apprenticeships offer up to four years of paid training in electrical, electronic, mechanical and software engineering.

Helen Johnson, STFC’s National Apprenticeship Scheme Manager, said: “At STFC we offer unique opportunities for our apprentices to work with state-of-the-art technology and actively contribute to some of the most fascinating science experiments of our time.

“By working with great teams on some ground-breaking projects, we support aspiring engineers to give them a flying start in their careers, whatever their end goal might be.

“We are really looking forward to meeting interested individuals who would like to join our team.”

During the day, visitors will meet current apprentices, find out more about the apprentice scheme and what future career options could be open to them after the apprenticeship, as have a chance to see inside the world-class facilities they could be working at.

Emily Galvin, an advanced mechanical engineering apprentice at STFC said: “I was so happy to find the scheme, as it opens up so many opportunities, not only on site, but also internationally. Just recently I travelled to the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble to complete a three-week placement there.

Aaron Scott

Aaron Scott, Advanced Mechanical Engineering Apprentice.
(Credit: STFC)

“I have learnt so many skills by working alongside, and learning from, experienced professionals. This has led me not only to become a more skilled engineer, but also taught me how to push and challenge myself in all areas of my learning.

“I’m so grateful for all the opportunities which have been presented to me, as it has allowed me to grow as an individual, as well as to better myself as an engineer.”

Fellow advanced mechanical engineering apprentice Aaron Scott, agreed that the scheme brings many benefits to those at the beginning of their careers. He said: “As an apprentice about to finish my apprenticeship, I find myself looking back to where I started and to where I am now. The apprenticeship scheme has been the best start for my career that I could have wished for.

“The apprentice scheme has given me the opportunity to work abroad at the ILL and at CERN, which has been a priceless experience.

“To anyone wondering about apprenticeships in general, I would say that they are the perfect way to kick-start your career. The apprenticeship scheme here at STFC and Diamond has given me a wide range of skills, knowledge and experience. Come along to on August 23 to see why.”

Find out more and register.

Contact

Becky Parker-Ellis
STFC Media office
01793 444564

Science and Technology Facilities Council Switchboard: 01793 442000