Features

End of CERN shutdown opens new possibilities for particle physics
27 October 2014
End of CERN shutdown opens new possibilities for particle physics

Two years of downtime for the accelerators have been used as an opportunity for consolidation and maintenance, but there have also been some major upgrades that will see the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) operating at even higher energies next year. Particle collisions at higher energies can create heavier particles, which will never have been seen before.

10 things we've learned from Cassini-Huygens
13 October 2014
10 things we've learned from Cassini-Huygens

October 1997 saw the launch of NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, complete with ESA’s Huygens probe. After a long journey through the solar system, Cassini became the first spacecraft to enter Saturn’s orbit in 2004. Initially given a four-year mission, Cassini’s work has been extended twice – the Equinox mission finished in 2010. Cassini’s Solstice mission is ongoing, scheduled to continue beyond the Saturnian summer solstice in May 2017. On the 10th anniversary of Cassini’s arrival at Saturn, we’re de

Lasers for Life
13 October 2014
Lasers for Life

You can’t go very far without encountering a laser these days. They’re used to read Blu-Ray discs and DVDs, by laser printers and barcode scanners and for handy things like laser pointers. Lasers are used in surgery, for industrial cutting and welding, and even for entertaining light shows. Lasers are a part of everyday modern life.

Crystallography
01 October 2014
Crystallography

Crystallography explores the structure of crystalline solids. Understanding the internal layout of materials leads to an understanding of why they have the properties they do; why diamond is hard, why graphite is soft and even why grass is green.

The past, present and future of science in Scotland
26 September 2014
The past, present and future of science in Scotland

In 1896, the Royal Observatory Edinburgh (ROE) moved from the centre of Edinburgh to its present location on Blackford Hill, thanks to a generous donation by James Lindsay, the 26th Earl of Crawford. The Earl offered the contents of his well-equipped observatory in Aberdeenshire, and a collection of rare astronomical books that is maintained at ROE to this day, provided that the government agreed to build and maintain a suitable building to house them

Superbugs vs. Superdrugs
28 July 2014
Superbugs vs. Superdrugs

Antibiotic use underpins much of modern medicine and has saved lives that might otherwise be lost to very common infections and minor injuries. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), antibiotics and vaccines add an average of 20 years to our lives. Advanced therapies such as cancer treatment and organ transplants, which make patients particularly vulnerable to infection, depend upon the use of antibiotics.

Dive in to the STFC Talent Pool
18 July 2014
Dive in to the STFC Talent Pool

Whether you’re just starting out in your career, or have years of experience under your belt, you don’t want to find yourself stuck dipping a toe in the water – it’s time to dive in!

An Astronomical First for Asteroids
25 June 2014
An Astronomical First for Asteroids

Imagine an 80 tonne asteroid hurtling towards the Earth at 30,000 mph. It may sound like science fiction but in October 2008 this scenario was a potentially dangerous reality.

Earth Day 2014
22 April 2014
Earth Day 2014

April 22nd is Earth Day, a day when more than a billion people in 190 different countries raise awareness of the environmental challenges we face, and their solutions. This year’s theme is Green Cities; as an ever-increasing proportion of the world’s population takes to city living, and as the impacts of climate change become clearer, the need to create more sustainable communities is more pressing than ever.

Love is in the air... or is it dark matter?
14 February 2014
Love is in the air... or is it dark matter?

It’s fair to say that science sometimes has a bit of an image problem. Hollywood loves to portray scientists as intellectual, hyper-rational people. Cold, perhaps even a little less human than normal people…. However, that’s complete poppycock – our hearts beat the same way as anyone else’s does, and every scientist has their passionate side. Since it’s Valentine’s Day, we thought we’d let you into a little secret - did you know that many of us spend our days contemplating the science of attract

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