Features

2014 in review
05 January 2015
2014 in review

A momentous event took place in November 2014, when a team of European scientists and engineers succeeded in performing the first controlled ‘touch down’ on a comet. At the time, comet 67P was 300 million miles away, and not visible from Earth. Signals to and from the Rosetta spacecraft were subject to a 25 minute delay.

The stakes are high as the search for supersymmetry goes on
05 January 2015
The stakes are high as the search for supersymmetry goes on

Neat…orderly…beautiful even – the theory of ‘supersymmetry’, or SUSY for short, is a scientist’s dream. It tidies up many loose ends left by the so-called Standard Model of particle physics.

How do you find something that's invisible?
16 December 2014
How do you find something that's invisible?

Call it Nature’s perfect practical joke. Call it the ultimate riddle posed by particle physics. Whichever way you look at it – if you could actually look at it – so-called ‘dark matter’ is a real cosmic enigma.

New horizons beckon for the Higgs boson
12 December 2014
New horizons beckon for the Higgs boson

4th July 2012 was a day to go down in the history of science. Before the eyes of the world, Rolf-Dieter Heuer, Director-General of the European Organization for Nuclear Science (CERN), announced the discovery of the Higgs boson.

12 years in Space Rosetta's deep space journey.
01 December 2014
12 years in Space Rosetta's deep space journey.

On 12th November 2014, ESA received confirmation that Rosetta’s Philae lander had successfully landed on comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko (often referred to simply as 67P, CG or Chury). The beginning of Philae’s up-close-and-personal science projects on the comet is the latest important milestone in Rosetta’s 12 year, deep space journey.

The Rosetta mission continues to push the boundaries of science and engineering
12 November 2014
The Rosetta mission continues to push the boundaries of science and engineering

The world will be watching closely as scientists and engineers try something that hasn’t been done before – a controlled ‘touch down’ on a comet.

Stories from women in science
07 November 2014
Stories from women in science

STFC have pledged support for the government’s Your Life campaign, which aims to encourage more women to take up careers in science technology, engineering and maths (STEM). One of the ways we can do this is to share stories about STEM women – whether engineers, scientists, technologists or mathematicians.

End of CERN shutdown opens new possibilities for particle physics
27 October 2014
End of CERN shutdown opens new possibilities for particle physics

Two years of downtime for the accelerators have been used as an opportunity for consolidation and maintenance, but there have also been some major upgrades that will see the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) operating at even higher energies next year. Particle collisions at higher energies can create heavier particles, which will never have been seen before.

10 things we've learned from Cassini-Huygens
13 October 2014
10 things we've learned from Cassini-Huygens

October 1997 saw the launch of NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, complete with ESA’s Huygens probe. After a long journey through the solar system, Cassini became the first spacecraft to enter Saturn’s orbit in 2004. Initially given a four-year mission, Cassini’s work has been extended twice – the Equinox mission finished in 2010. Cassini’s Solstice mission is ongoing, scheduled to continue beyond the Saturnian summer solstice in May 2017. On the 10th anniversary of Cassini’s arrival at Saturn, we’re de

Lasers for Life
13 October 2014
Lasers for Life

You can’t go very far without encountering a laser these days. They’re used to read Blu-Ray discs and DVDs, by laser printers and barcode scanners and for handy things like laser pointers. Lasers are used in surgery, for industrial cutting and welding, and even for entertaining light shows. Lasers are a part of everyday modern life.

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